On Friday 5 July, Councillors, council officers, and participants from the voluntary, community, faith, and social enterprise sector joined us at Federation House for a half-day workshop exploring findings from focus groups re-examining the role of local Councillors. This was the closing stakeholder event for our ARC project, Testing the 21st Century Councillor framework, delivered in partnership with North West Employers.

On Monday 1 July, we gathered in the Defiant room at Federation House in Manchester for the third in a series of events intended to explore how the networks around Jam and Justice might pioneer Greater Manchester as a model of co-production. The main event began with a cake-cutting, marking the official opening of Jam & Justice’s National Co-Production Week activities. And yes, the cake was every bit as good as it looks.

More than sixty people gathered at the Ziferblat event space in Manchester’s Northern Quarter to celebrate the publication of the report, How can we govern cities differently? The promise and practices of co-production.

This blogpost takes a close look at the data underpinning the Infographic in Jam and Justice's report, How can we govern cities differently? The promise and practices of co-production.

During a visit to Gothenburg in March 2019, the Jam and Justice delegation held three workshops with officers from Gothenburg City Council and Gothenburg Region Assocation of Local Authorities. In this 6th post from the translocal learning series, Jam and Justice ARC member Adrian Ball reflects how preparing to speak in Gothenburg prompted him to appreciate the ways the project had influenced his day job.


Adrian writes:

For post five in our Trans-local Learning mini-series, Fiona Bottrill, Justice and Engagement Programme Manager in West Midlands Combined Authority, reflects on her experience visiting Gothenburg Region. Fiona writes:

In this fourth post for our Trans-local Learning mini-series, GMCA officer Anne Lythgoe reflects on a visit to Gothenburg Region.


Co-production: working with local democracy

Co-production is a way of designing and delivering public services in a more democratic fashion, giving citizens control over the day-to-day decisions which affect their lives. [source]

On 26 March 2019, the Jam and Justice team collaborated with the National Association for Neighbourhood Management (NANM) to run a "treasure hunt" in Greater Manchester, exploring findings from Jam and Justice through a direct encounter with community projects. Ben Lee of NANM reports on the event. 

To exemplify co-productive design principles means challenging the idea of an ‘end-user’ who receives a final report. It means rethinking what impact looks like and how it can be achieved. Our commitment is to engage decision-makers in a collaborative learning journey through informal spaces for exchange and international networking.  Trans-local learning is an important element in opening up spaces for learning and dissemination often reserved for academics to urban decision-makers.  Trans-localism is more than just cities learning from each other across national boundaries. It points to the need for meaningful interactions between networked individuals and groups of similarly thinking people beyond the local. What is at stake is a sense of belonging through shared perspectives and concerns that transcend local boundaries. 

In this third blog for our Trans-local Learning mini-series, Action Research Collective member Alice Toomer McAlpine reflects on her experience at the International Observatory on Participatory Democracy in Barcelona in November 2018.